01. Intro

La vie moderne

La vie moderne

Ralph Rugoff, guest curator

The impulse to announce a clean break from the past, to instigate a rupture with tradition, is the modernist gesture par excellence. Is it possible then, that our recurring desire to declare the end of the modern era is, in fact, merely a symptom of the modernity it aspires to bury? In any case, it seems well worth considering an alternative scenario: namely, that the various trajectories of the modern project still actively inflect and shape our perceptions as well as the outstanding issues of our time.
La vie moderne, the 13th edition of the Biennale de Lyon, sets out to explore this possibility. Its title unavoidably evokes echoes of earlier, and perhaps more optimistic, moments in history, but rather than its potential irony, what drew me to use this title was its ambiguity. In colloquial usage the adjective “modern” still implies something recent or new, yet this particular phrase carries with it a long history that ranges from the relatively recent documentary on rural France, La Vie Moderne (2008), by filmmaker Raymond Depardon to the publication of Charles Baudelaire’s essay “Le Peintre de la vie moderne”, in Le Figaro in 1863. So today this phrase embodies a bemusing temporal uncertainty: it can serve to indicate our current moment even as it suggests a kind of period piece or relic from a bygone era. Rather than simply evoking the contents or “theme” of this exhibition, my hope is that this title thus poses a question – ot so much about the “modern,” however variously that term might be defined, but about the nature of our present and the kinds of dialogues it carries forward with the past. Bringing together artists whose work reflects on and extrapolates from the contradictory character of present-day life in different regions of the world, La vie moderne is also acutely attuned to the ways in which contemporary culture constitutes a working through, and a response to, prior events and traditions. Even as the artists in the exhibition explore current situations and images, they are also excavating the past. Their work articulates a fluid sense of how various moments in time link up in the current moment, while often confronting us with unexpected connections between them.

Our relationship with temporality is a subject embedded in the very concept of a biennale. A biennale, after all, is a type of exhibition that is defined by its temporal structure, i.e. the fact that it occurs every two years. Even as it provides (among other things) an occasion for tracking developments in art in varied parts of the world, a biennale also functions as a kind of clock, a way of measuring time. La vie moderne aspires to be a very particular clock – one that simultaneously registers and evokes seemingly incompatible or contradictory time zones. We find something like an emblem of this approach in Marina Pinsky’s photograph A&B Time (2013), a picture featuring a display of different kinds of watches and clocks laid out on a colourful printed fabric embellished with images of various timepieces and scythes. To make this picture, the artist photographed her “unstill” life with two very different exposure durations, one made during the day and another at night. Rather than capturing the monolithic “instant” that we routinely ascribe to photographs, Pinsky’s picture instead brings together representations of time that reflect alternative temporalities. It is my hope that, when taken together, the many distinct and different works in La vie moderne similarly conjure a sense of how myriad historical time zones are secreted and concealed within the homogenizing images of “contemporary” culture.

On one level, then, La vie moderne is an exhibition aimed at undermining our superficial concepts of the “contemporary.” All too often the contemporary is framed as a kind of deracinated perpetual present, an endless horizon of the now. Yet as even a quick scan of events across the globe reveals, our “contemporary” landscape is far from being a uniform field of the novel and new. In many regions of the world, fast-tracked technological and economic changes co-exist with transitions to social and cultural modes typical of much earlier eras. Consider such “contemporary” developments as the global rise of religious crusades; the alleged return of the Cold War; and the accelerating economic disparity between the world’s richest and poorest, which has now reached levels not seen since the 19th century. The alleged “end of history” signaled by the “triumph” of capitalism in the late 20th century has given way to a strange program mixing contemporary “advances” with re-runs of zombie-like histories.
A number of artists in La vie moderne address this situation in works that explore images of the present as a kind of palimpsest layered with traces of earlier moments; other works unexpectedly move from current-day scenarios to historical references. It is an approach  sed by artists – including T.J. Wilcox, Sammy Baloji and Cyprien Gaillard, to name only a few – whose work otherwise embraces very distinct concerns and aesthetic positions. Proposing or revealing alternate routes through history, works such as these reactivate relationships with the past as a crucial dimension of our present experience. It is a way of repositioning the “contemporary” that bears an affinity, albeit indirectly, to the manner in which philosopher Vinciane Despret describes our complex relations with the dead. In a video by Hannah Hurtzig commissioned for this Biennale, the philosopher addresses a subject that traditional psychology has not fully imagined: the range of possible relationships that we might have with people after they have died; the different ways that they continue to converse with and influence us; the on-going and evolving roles that they play in our thoughts and emotions. From this viewpoint, the death of someone does not end our relationship with them, but merely changes its terms. One could say something similar about the passing of an event, a movement, or even an era.
It is not so easy, it seems, to leave the past behind. 

As suggested already, this is intended to be an exhibition that invites its users to reflect on changing social and cultural landscapes that characterize modern life in France as well as elsewhere in the world. Some works explore issues regularly covered in the daily news media, ranging from crises created by excess consumption and economic inequalities to questions related to post-colonialism, immigration and national identity. Others investigate less “topical” areas that are no less characteristic of our present moment, including our changing sense of the  relationship between images and objects, work and leisure, the physical and the virtual.

This general intention of La vie moderne reflects an underlying assumption that art is a crucial means for helping us to better understand the world around us. It is a tool no less important in this regard than philosophy or science. Of course, this is not to suggest that art somehow competes with these disciplines in offering an equally systematic analysis of the conditions of existence. Nor does art comprise a type of documentary journalism or reportage that informs us about facts and events in an allegedly objective manner. Unlike scientists, philosophers and journalists, artists are not in the business of providing answers. Departing from conventional models of thinking and seeing, they instead embrace contradictions, juggle multiple viewpoints and in general ignore the constraints of necessity. In addition, artists often notice things that the rest of us are not paying attention to; they map undetected connections and associations. Consequently their work has the capacity to develop and articulate alternative perspectives. For this reason it can offer us a crucial option to the “normalizing” pictures of our social landscape that are conveyed through the news media, advertising, traditional education, corporate culture, etc.
Over 150 years ago, in his essay “Le Peintre de la vie moderne,” Baudelaire exhorted artists to focus their work on scenes of contemporary life – to memorialise the transient and trenchant gestures of modernity. Most importantly, perhaps, he advocated a position for painting that, rather than compete with photography, would instead fuse reportage with the “high philosophical imagination” of fine art. Today, equivalents to that type of transformative “imagination” are evident in the way that artists in this Biennale explore “la vie moderne” from unpredictable vantage points; with conceptual frameworks that defy formulaic schemes; and by combining unexpected aesthetic registers and values.
These artists are not concerned with simply showing us what is new, but with showing us things – often very familiar things – in new ways that allow us to re-imagine their possible significance. The power of art lies in this generative potential – its capacity to convey proliferating meanings and so to open up potential conversations rather than closing them down with authoritative  pronouncements. Art is developed through a process of asking questions and it solicits our engagement in a parallel activity of inquiry and wondering (which often, of course, involves our feeling momentarily perplexed, disoriented, or uncertain).
A biennale, then, should really be a forum for generating and considering different kinds of questions. In putting this exhibition together, I have sought to include artworks that raise a broad range of questions about various aspects of our lives today, while exploring critical matters without which any portrait of “la vie moderne” would seem incomplete. Like all complex works of art, these works also explore varied formal and conceptual concerns. Yet at the risk of being reductively simplistic, most of the works in this Biennale can be grouped into several broad areas of inquiry. Modern economic life is one of those subject areas, encompassing concerns related to labor relations; the growing inequality of wealth; energy production and use; and the fall-out from our society of consumption. A work such as Andrea Lolis’s Permanent Residence (2015), a marble sculpture carved with trompe-l’oeil precision to resemble an impoverished habitat made from discarded packaging materials, invokes both the precariousness of the global  conomy (with particular reference to the dire economic situation of Greece) as well as the way in which many societies treat certain of their members as human garbage. Comprising a kind of “salon of refuse,” a surprising number of works in the exhibition traffic in images of used-up commodities and waste, ranging from Ed Ruscha’s heroically-scaled paintings of roadside rubbish to Mike Nelson’s A7 (2015) installation featuring blown out tires salvaged from the principal motorway leading into Lyon. If consumerism imposes the only shared values that we still have today, as the writer J.G. Ballard once observed, then these artworks present us with the ruins of a phantom collectivity.
Other works in the exhibition address questions concerning national identity, postcolonial politics, and immigration. These issues have recently played a critical role in French society, as well as in many other nations. Kader ttia’s newly produced 18-channel video installation (Réparer l’irréparable, 2015) elaborates an extended dialogue with ethnopsychologists as a way of exploring issues that emerged in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo massacre. The problematic politics of immigration are also touched on by Andra Ursuta’s Commerce Exterieur Mondial Sentimental (2012), a totemic figurative sculpture which was inspired by a photograph of a Romanian Gypsy woman awaiting deportation from France. In these and other works, we find artists investigating and looking askance at the contradictions of postcolonial liberal democracies.
Fall-out from the accelerated growth of technologies that impact both our global environment and our everyday lives is examined from different angles by a wide range of artists in the exhibition. At the beginning of this century, Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen argued that we had entered a new period, the Anthropocene, which is defined by human industry’s pervasive impact on biological, geological and chemical processes on the planet. This state of affairs is eerily evoked in several installations in the Biennale that conjure the increasing technological mediation of our relationships with “nature.” Other works allude to the possible responses of individuals to rectify the despoiling of their environment by industrial and military activities. Meanwhile, Daniel Naudé’s arresting photographic portraits of both wild and domesticated animals in Africa and India seemingly haunt the exhibition as icons conjuring an encroaching horizon of extinction for countless species.
The manner in which we relate to and read images – one of the fundamental activities of “la vie moderne” – has been profoundly impacted by the so-called digital revolution. From the flattened cultural landscape augmented by the World Wide Web to the increasingly intimate integration of personal communication devices in our daily lives, our encounters with pictures today occur in profoundly different ways than they did a generation ago. Images now appear almost simultaneously across multiple platforms, displaying different forms of behavior in varied contexts. They have seemingly developed their own performative capacities, confronting us in endless transformations. The act of looking required by this situation entails swift shifts in speed and styles of registration, so that contemporary vision becomes a tangled pile-up of competing modes of perception. Working in many different ways, a large contingent of artists in La vie moderne explore  the varied consequences of these recent developments. The question of how we differentiate between “reality” and the “virtual” worlds in which we spend more and more time is taken up in works produced by several generations of artists, ranging from Tony Oursler to Katja Novitskova. Installations such as Jon Rafman’s Troll Cave (2015), which conjures the rooms inhabited by obsessive gamers during endless hours of play, allude to a blurring threshold between the physical and the virtual, while those by artists such as Laura Lamiel and Emmanuelle Lainé extend this exploration as they confoundingly commingle architectural and illusory or representational spaces. A number of other artists play on the way that our perception of the difference between objects and pictures has become increasingly blurred: physical things assume photographic values in some of these works, while photographic imagery takes on the appearance or form of sculptural artefact.
Several installations in La vie moderne indirectly evoke the way in which global information flows have reached a state of extreme abstraction, as algorithms shepherd and harness vast streams of data, allowing them to be manipulated and re-articulated in ever-changing configurations. With this scenario as a conceptual backdrop, these works present densely layered structures of visual information or sound that subvert our straightforward efforts to grasp their over-all form. Conjuring self-generating systems of overwhelming complexity, such works allude to a profound ongoing shift in our relationships with the information landscapes around us. Representational painting, meanwhile, plays a significant role in this Biennale – not by simply depicting scenes of what might pass for “la vie moderne” but by suggesting different ways in which we might meaningfully construct relationships with images today. Against the backdrop of our over-saturated visual environment and our search-engine access to the entire archive of human picturemaking, these artists approach painting as a speculative medium, an arena in which to test how different contexts, genres, and pictorial styles can modify the way we read an image and allow us to find meanings that we might otherwise not discover. Drawing on varied sources ranging from news photographs and computer-generated “sketches” to images from art history, many of their paintings conflate currents of reference and repetition, uncannily entangling forms associated with both the past and the present. 

When I initially began thinking about this exhibition, one of my very first questions was: who is this Biennale for? While a biennale is traditionally an exhibition with a broad international scope, it seemed to me that it should be designed above all for the people who will visit and use it. Thus it should engage with cultural and social dialogues that seem particularly pertinent to the city and nation where the exhibition is staged. Accordingly, La vie moderne developed a distinct regional accent: roughly a fifth of the artists selected for this Biennale are of French origin, while a number have created new works that extrapolate from histories and situations specific to Lyon, including new commissions made in collaboration with groups of Lyon residents who span the city’s economic spectrum.
As noted already, art’s capacity to fashion alternative viewpoints makes it an indispensable part of our larger cultural life. It offers an arena in which we can encounter the familiar from unexpected or unexamined angles, and in which we may find new ways of asking questions about the world we live in. It can also help alert us to new possibilities for engaging with the shifting contexts and issues around which our lives unfold. It is my hope that this Biennale offers a forum in which its different users can take advantage of these potentials, and – in a sprawling conversation with artists from across the globe – develop new questions and ways of thinking about the current situations shaping their culture and society.
As a curator, I have been deeply influenced by Marcel Duchamp’s assertion that the viewer is responsible for half the content of any work of art. In a similar spirit, my hope is that this Biennale is used by its various publics as a jumping off point for their own conversations and thoughts. Towards that end, I have selected artists for this exhibition who are not interested in making definitive statements and pronouncements in their work, but instead seek to open up potential conversations, often by unsettling our common assumptions and ways of looking.
Finally, and despite the futility of making such generalised statements, I would add that most of the artists in this exhibition share an attitude that is at once playful and deeply thoughtful. As a result, even though many works in the Biennale touch on “serious” issues, I have never imagined that this exhibition would be remotely gloomy or depressing. Instead, these artists approach their subjects with so much ingenuity and vitality, as well as formal and conceptual daring, that the primary effect of their work is to engage and energize us. Even when it confronts us with disturbing material or unsettling perspectives, their work involves and engages us in asking questions that can only help us to grasp more fully, and to feel more closely connected to, the paradoxes of our own “vie moderne.” 

THE END



Gallery
La vie moderne 126 photos
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© Blaise Adilon

Hannah Hurtzig
Night Lessons 2 - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Hannah Hurtzig
Night Lessons 2 - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Miguel Angel Rios
The Ghost of Modernity Lixiviados - 2012
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Miguel Angel Rios
The Ghost of Modernity Lixiviados - 2012
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Miguel Angel Rios
The Ghost of Modernity Lixiviados - 2012
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Cyprien GAILLARD Soundtrack © BLACK MAN’S WORLD Performed by Alton Ellis, (P) 1970 Sanctuary Records Ltd., a BMG Company, Courtesy of BMG Rights Management GmbH Written and composed by Alton N. Ellis, published by Haka Taka Music, Courtesy of Melodie de

Cyprien Gaillard
Nightlife - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Cyprien GAILLARD Soundtrack © BLACK MAN’S WORLD Performed by Alton Ellis, (P) 1970 Sanctuary Records Ltd., a BMG Company, Courtesy of BMG Rights Management GmbH Written and composed by Alton N. Ellis, published by Haka Taka Music, Courtesy of Melodie de

Cyprien Gaillard
Nightlife - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Cyprien GAILLARDSoundtrack © BLACK MAN’S WORLD Performed by Alton Ellis, (P) 1970 Sanctuary Records Ltd., a BMG Company, Courtesy of BMG Rights Management GmbH Written and composed by Alton N. Ellis, published by Haka Taka Music, Courtesy of Melodie der

Cyprien Gaillard
Nightlife - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

David Shrigley
Start/Finish -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

David Shrigley
Start/Finish -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

David Shrigley
Start/Finish -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Jon Rafman
Nine Eyes of Google Street View - 2014
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Jon Rafman
Nine Eyes of Google Street View - 2014
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Lai Chih-Sheng
Border_Lyon - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Lai Chih-Sheng
Border_Lyon - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

T.J. Wilcox
In the Air - 2013-Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Fabien Giraud / Raphaël Siboni

Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni
La Mémoire de masse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Fabien Giraud / Raphaël Siboni

Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni
La Mémoire de masse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Fabien Giraud / Raphaël Siboni

Fabien Giraud & Raphaël Siboni
La Mémoire de masse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Les oxymores de la Raison / Reason's oxymoron - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Les oxymores de la Raison / Reason's oxymoron - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Traditional Repair, Immaterial Injury - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Traditional Repair, Immaterial Injury - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Traditional Repair, Immaterial Injury - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Kader Attia
Traditional Repair, Immaterial Injury - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Hicham Berrada
Mesk-ellil -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Hicham Berrada
Mesk-ellil -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Hicham Berrada
Mesk-ellil -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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Alex Da Corte
Taut Eye Tau - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Alex Da Corte
Taut Eye Tau - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Magdi Mostafa
The Surface of Spectral Scattering - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Magdi Mostafa
The Surface of Spectral Scattering - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Magdi Mostafa
The Surface of Spectral Scattering - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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Ahmet Öğüt
Workers taking over the factory - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Ahmet Öğüt
Workers taking over the factory - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Ahmet Öğüt
Workers taking over the factory - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Camille Blatrix
La liberté, l'amour, la vitesse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Camille Blatrix
La liberté, l'amour, la vitesse - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot
aura - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot
aura - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Céleste Boursier-Mougenot
aura - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Jessica Diamond
Le Vin Avant La Roue (left) - The Modern World (right) - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

George Condo
Zombie Modernism - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Mohamed Bourouissa
Unknown#18 - 2014-2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Marina Pinsky
Sun Valley - 2013
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Michael Armitage
Lucy - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Sammy Baloji
Hunting & Collecting - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Sammy Baloji
Hunting & Collecting - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Michel Blazy
Pull over time - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Michel Blazy
Pull over time - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Michel Blazy
Pull over time - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Nguyen Trinh Thi
Landscape Series #1 - 2013
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Nguyen Trinh Thi
Landscape Series #1 - 2013
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Nguyen Trinh Thi
Landscape Series #1 - 2013
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Otobong Nkanga
Wetin You Go Do? - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Otobong Nkanga
Wetin You Go Do? - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Otobong Nkanga
Wetin You Go Do? - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Anna Ostoya
Red, Blue, Yellow - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Julien Prévieux
Petite anthologie de la triche - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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Julien Prévieux
Petite anthologie de la triche - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Marinella Senatore
The Word Community Feels Good - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Marinella Senatore
The Word Community Feels Good - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Marinella Senatore
The Word Community Feels Good - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
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© Blaise Adilon

Cameron Jamie
Front Lawn Funerals and Cemeteries - 1984-ongoing
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Cameron Jamie
Front Lawn Funerals and Cemeteries - 1984-ongoing
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Cameron Jamie
Front Lawn Funerals and Cemeteries - 1984-ongoing
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Laura Lamiel
Chambre de capture : Figure A - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
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© Blaise Adilon

Ed Ruscha
Gators -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
75/0

© Blaise Adilon

Avery Singer
Dancers around an Effigy to Modernism - 2013
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
76/0

Arseny Zhilyaev
The Aesthetic Complex of the Post-Sonet Oligarchy Period - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
77/0

Arseny Zhilyaev
The Aesthetic Complex of the Post-Sonet Oligarchy Period - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
78/0

© Blaise Adilon

Arseny Zhilyaev
The Aesthetic Complex of the Post-Sonet Oligarchy Period - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
79/0

Haegue Yang
Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
80/0

Haegue Yang
Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
81/0

© Blaise Adilon

Haegue Yang
Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
82/0

© Blaise Adilon

Yto Barrada
Cabane de Lauriers, Fig. 2, (Oleander Summer Shed), Sidi Mghai - 2009
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
83/0

© Blaise Adilon

Yto Barrada
Plumber assemblage, Fig. 7 Tanger - 2014
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
84/0

© Blaise Adilon

Thomas Eggerer
Waterworld - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
85/0

Emmanuelle Lainé
il parait que le fond de l’être est en train de changer ? - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
86/0

Emmanuelle Lainé
il parait que le fond de l’être est en train de changer ? - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
87/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Beier
13 works by Nina Beier -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
88/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Beier
13 works by Nina Beier -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
89/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Beier
13 works by Nina Beier -
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
90/0

© Blaise Adilon

Johannes Kahrs
Untitled (monkey man) - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
91/0

© Blaise Adilon

Johannes Kahrs
Untitled (on the balcony) - 2012-2013
La vie moderne | Le Musée d'art contemporain de Lyon (macLYON)
92/0

© Blaise Adilon

Katja Novitskova
Approximation (planet Mars HD) and Bannini Dodoli de Luxe Grey - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
93/0

© Blaise Adilon

Katja Novitskova
Discover and Grow jumperoo ; Approximation (enzyme) ; Bannini Dodoli de Luxe Grey - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
94/0

© Blaise Adilon

Lucie Stahl
Asphalt Jungle - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
95/0

© Blaise Adilon

Lucie Stahl
Identity and Memento - 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
96/0

Cecilia Bengolea & Jeremy Deller
Rhythmasspoetry - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
97/0

Cecilia Bengolea & Jeremy Deller
Rhythmasspoetry - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
98/0

Cecilia Bengolea & Jeremy Deller
Rhythmasspoetry - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
99/0

© Blaise Adilon

Cecilia Bengolea & Jeremy Deller
Rhythmasspoetry - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art (macLYON)
100/0

© Blaise Adilon

Guan Xiao
Tumbling Glory and Rolling Beating - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
101/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Canell
Mid-Sentence - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
102/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Canell
Mid-Sentence - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
103/0

© Blaise Adilon

Nina Canell
Mid-Sentence - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
104/0

© Blaise Adilon

Anthea Hamilton
Kar-a-sutra - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
105/0

© Blaise Adilon

Anthea Hamilton
Kar-a-sutra - 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
106/0

© Blaise Adilon

Liu Wei
Enigma - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
107/0

© Blaise Adilon

Liu Wei
Enigma - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
108/0

© Blaise Adilon

Liu Wei
Enigma - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
109/0

© Blaise Adilon

Andreas Lolis
Permanent Residence - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
110/0

© Blaise Adilon

Andreas Lolis
Permanent Residence - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
111/0

© Blaise Adilon

Andreas Lolis
Permanent Residence - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
112/0

© Blaise Adilon

Daniel Naudé
Africanis 20. Petrusville, Northern Cape - 19 April, 2011
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
113/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tony Oursler
“Weak-classifers” - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
114/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tony Oursler
“Weak-classifers” - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
115/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tony Oursler
“Weak-classifers” - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
116/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tony Oursler
“Weak-classifers” - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
117/0

© Blaise Adilon

Klaus Weber
emergency blanket - Création Biennale 2015
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
118/0

© Blaise Adilon

Simon Denny
The personnal effects of Kim Dotcom - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
119/0

© Blaise Adilon

Simon Denny
The personnal effects of Kim Dotcom - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
120/0

© Blaise Adilon

Simon Denny
The personnal effects of Kim Dotcom - 2014
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
121/0

© Blaise Adilon

Cameron Jamie
All works -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
122/0

© Blaise Adilon

Cameron Jamie
All works -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
123/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tatiana Trouvé
Works to Tatiana Trouvé -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
124/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tatiana Trouvé
Works to Tatiana Trouvé -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
125/0

© Blaise Adilon

Tatiana Trouvé
Works to Tatiana Trouvé -
La vie moderne | La Sucrière
126/0

© Blaise Adilon

George Osodi
HRM Benjamin Ikenchuku Keaborekuzi 1, Dein of Agbor - 2012
La vie moderne | La Sucrière